Today is the Lord’s Day, so let’s remember that it’s better to be right than popular

By John Miller

22nd October, 2017

 

Jeremiah was not a popular fellow in his day. The people of Israel had turned away from God and were lusting after their false idols. The creeping Baalism of our current age is no less insidious, and once again it has become unfashionable to take a stand for God. The punishment of Israel was stayed by one righteous king, Josiah. Once he was gone, his countrymen resumed their wicked ways. Few wanted to listen to what God had to say through Jeremiah, after Josiah perished in battle.

Josiah’s son Jehoiakim was a sexual deviant who promoted Godlessness and was vexatious with his taxes. He hated Jeremiah, and tried to have him killed. His brother Zedekiah let the wicked mob do as they pleased, and saw the Chaldean Babylonians sack Jerusalem.

God departed the Temple of Solomon, and it was destroyed. His Chosen people who had abandoned the covenant were led away in captivity to Babylon.

Jeremiah lamenting the destruction of Jerusalem

All seemed lost, but Jeremiah still had one hopeful prophecy, reminding us of the boundless grace of God.

The prophecy of Jeremiah about the New Israel from the 31st Chapter of the Book of Jeremiah, verses 31-33: Behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel, and with the house of Judah: Not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day that I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt; which my covenant they brake, although I was an husband unto them, saith the LORD: But this shall be the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel; After those days, saith the LORD, I will put my law in their inward parts, and write it in their hearts; and will be their God, and they shall be my people.

To skip forward several centuries to its fulfillment, past the return of the Babylonian exiles freed by Cyrus the Magnificent, of Ezra and the rebuilding of the Second Temple, to the era of the corrupt Herodian dynasty and Rome, and our own Lord Jesus Christ, to the fulfilment of Jeremiah’s prophecy at the Lord’s Supper.

22nd Chapter of the Gospel of Luke, verses 14-22: And when the hour was come, he sat down, and the twelve apostles with him. And he said unto them, With desire I have desired to eat this passover with you before I suffer: For I say unto you, I will not any more eat thereof, until it be fulfilled in the kingdom of God. And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and said, Take this, and divide it among yourselves: For I say unto you, I will not drink of the fruit of the vine, until the kingdom of God shall come. And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me. Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood, which is shed for you. But, behold, the hand of him that betrayeth me is with me on the table. And truly the Son of man goeth, as it was determined: but woe unto that man by whom he is betrayed!

It is easy to be a Judas in the present age, and take your thirty pieces of silver from the authorities, but never worth it in the end. Even Saint Peter was timid before the mob at first, but he came good in a spectacular fashion, and spoke truth to Roman power.

Saint Peter was the rock upon which Christ built the Church, but even his Rome would grow vain and corrupt again, forcing men like Zwingli, Luther, Calvin, Cranmer and Knox to once again risk everything for God.

We have our Josiah in Trump, a ruler eager to support Israel and Christians. Before the final reckoning, let us all keep speaking up for Israel, for Christ and for Judeo-Christian values, until like Jeremiah our speaking of truth to power gets us thrown into the well by the reckless mob.

God bless you all, and go with Christ, on this the Day of our Lord.

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